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20121101
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Search Results 0 to 28 of about 29 (some duplicates have been removed)
president mohamed morsi and his opponents. outrage aimed at mr. morsi after the announcement of a number of controversial decrees earlier this week that give him sweeping powers. they make him at least temporarily the most powerful man in egypt. also seems to be an effort to push through the all-important drafting of the new constitution and putting in place the formation of egypt's new parliament want. one of the decrees bans anyone, even the judiciary, from appealing, overturning, questioning any decision mr. morsi has made since taking office in june. that order is to be set in place until a new parliament is formed. so technically, he's going to be the most powerful man essentially he can do whatever he wants, without any oversight. that's one of the decrees, john, that has a lot of his opponents describing this as an undemocratic power grab. >> and do these changes affect both his creditics and opponents or just his opponents? >> reporter: well, look. right now, the political landscape favors mr. morsi and his political movement the, the muslim brotherhood, and certainly these decre
on friday, friday one of the most intense and violent days of demonstrations that we've seen since mr. morsi, the egyptian president took office back in june. more than 140 people injured throughout egypt, according to the health ministry, in clashes between protesters and police. a little under 40 people injured in kay row. several with gunshot wounds. also, more than 200 people arrested and many on charges of thuggery and destroying public property. those arrested seem to be younger men who are out looking for trouble, but certainly thousands showed up to express what they call as legitimate and serious concern about mr. morsi's decrees that at least for the time being give him sweeping powers without any oversight for the next several months. he says these moves are an effort to move forward the democratic process and to draft a constitution. his opponents describe it as an undemocratic power grab, and now this face-off is taking shape. one of mr. morsi's advisers quitting today, the supreme court judicial council, the body that represents the top judges, held an emergency meeting today w
at former president hosni mubarak. now aimed at mr. morsi. there were some clashes during the protest in tahrir square that are ongoing. the clashes witnesses say were caused by protesters that threw rocks at security forces. the security forces responded by firing tear gas. and back and forth went this cat and mouse game that has been emblematic of these protests. the outranl comes after the decrees last night that many critics are describing as a power grab. one of the decrees bans anyone even the judiciary from putting into question, overturning any of his decisions since he came into power in june. he says these moves are to move along the democratic process and to protect the revolution. obviously at this hour he has many opponents who disagree with them and they're expressing their outrage right now. >> the protests aren't just in cairo. they're in other cities. reza, do you have any idea who these people are? who are these protesters? are they former loyalists to the regime? >> no. certainly not. these are many of the factions that spearheaded the 2011 egyptian revolution. they
. what should the united states of america do? saying this unacceptable. we thank mr. morsi for his efforts in brokering a cease-fire, which is fragile but this is not what the united states of america taxpayers expect and our dollars will be directly related to the progress towards democracy which you promised the people of egypt when your party and you were elected president. >> chris: let's talk about that because morsi took his steps ours after secretary of state hillary clinton praised him for helping to broker the peace deal between hamas and israel and the administration issued the state department a tepid criticism. how tough should they get? should they say you have to pull back? what should our demands and leverage be? >> our leverage is not only substantial bayance and aid, plus an imf deal but the marshaling world public opinion is also against this kind of move by mr. morsi. we appreciate president morsi's action but in the past it's always been the united states that's brokered these deals and there's a clear perception amongst hamas that they won on this one. unfortun
condemnations. >> we have also had to -- the new head of government in egypt, mr. morsi -- recognize the importance of the truce with israel that egypt has had. some of the things he has done this week are very troubling toward that end. you upon, he went into gaza. while he was there, hamas launched more rockets, as a direct affront to that negotiated peace between egypt and israel that. piece is essential to u.s. security policy in the region. and so we are going to have to insist and mr. morsi honor that -- >> greta: what leverage do we have with him? >> well, i mean, certainly, there is a package of aid that the egyptians are asking for right now, for giveness of debt, is one aspect of that. you know, i think that the message needs to be sent that the largess of the american taxpayers doesn't come for free. egypt has an obligation to stand by its commitments to israel, to oppose terrorist activity, as we see coming out of gaza. and now, into israel, aimed at innocent lives. and gret ai think the larger picture in the middle-east is really reflecking iran's -- reflecting iran's ac
. and so we are going to have to insist and mr. morsi honor that -- >> greta: what leverage do we have with him? >> well, i mean, certainly, there is a package of aid that the egyptians are asking for right now, for giveness of debt, is one aspect of that. you know, i think that the message needs to be sent that the largess of the american taxpayers doesn't come for free. egypt has an obligation to stand by its commitments to israel, to oppose terrorist activity, as we see coming out of gaza. and now, into israel, aimed at innocent lives. and gret ai think the larger picture in the middle-east is really reflecking iran's -- reflecting iran's activity. we're all focusing on iran's request for nuclear weapons capability. but this also shows you iran's influence through its proxies. iran has played an active role in arming hamas, since 2008. and once israel went in there, that worked out a lot of things and there was not a lot of rocket attacks am now we see the return because iran and its ally, syria, have played a re-armament role, in terms of tens of thousands of rockets delivered into
in the effort to try to end the fighting between israel and hamas. but mr. morsi walking a very tight political and social, for that matter, tight rope. reza sayah joining us from cairo. reza, morsi playing a pivot on the role, as egypt has in the past, in these talks. balancing the expectations of his street, the people that elected him and the muslim brotherhood, as well as the u.s. and the international community and all that is bound into that. >> yeah. michael, in many ways as we speak today egyptian president mohammed morsi is viewed as maybe the most important voice for the palestinians on the world stage, and to understand the type of pressure he is under it's so important to understand how arabs, how egyptians view this conflict between the palestinians and the israelis because it is very different from the western view. egyptians, arabs, look at the latest round of fighting, and they see more than 130 palestinians killed compared to five israelis killed. they should taking on fighters that are smuggling weapons in, and they see israel as an illegal occupying force for more than 40 yea
the scene for us this morning and how important mr. morsi is in the solution we see here. >> reporter: yeah, christine, this is another critical day in this conflict. a lot of people anxious to see what happens in the coming hours. it's a little after 12:00 noon cairo time and in a couple of hours secretary clinton is scheduled to arrive in cairo meeting with the egyptian president mohammad morsi as well as the arab league. whenever big conflicts happen in the middle east, washington wants to be seen as playing a major role as peacemaker. that is clearly why mrs. clinton is in the region today, but it is also clear that throughout the past few days it's been egypt that's taking the lead as peacemaker. obviously, they have strong links to hamas and they also have links with israel with that peace treaty they have promised to abide by. so they seem to be logical peacemaker. yesterday they were optimistic that a cease-fire would be established. mr. morsi says he expects the aggression to stop. obviously, christine, that didn't happen. heavy fighting throughout the night and the early morning h
the treaty between israel and egypt. there's a lot in it for egypt. mr. morsi has to be a pragmatist. he knows he can't alienate the united states. he may want to impose a measure of islamism. >> thanks so much for enlightening us. we appreciate it. >> thank you. >>> we'll take a quick break and be back with much more in the newsroom. meet the 5-passenger ford c-max hybrid. when you're carrying a lot of weight, c-max has a nice little trait, you see, c-max helps you load your freight, with its foot-activated lift gate. but that's not all you'll see, cause c-max also beats prius v, with better mpg. say hi to the all-new 47 combined mpg c-max hybrid. >>> 30 minutes past the hour. good morning, i'm carol costello. former cia director david petraeus testifying on capitol hill about the deadly attacks in benghazi, talking about what he knew and when. the firestorm over benghazi, it just keeps getting more splo explosive. here are members of the house foreign affairs committee in a briefing on the attacks yesterday. >> what is clear is that this administration, including the president himself,
for mr. morsi. remember, the muslim brotherhood created hamas in the first place. >> can i ask you one more question, regarding qatar's role in all of this. while while iran may be supplying the arms to hamas, they brought $4 million to hamas to buy that. what does that say with our policy? they are all allies of ours. >> it raises questions. the a i mere of qatar paid the first state official visit to gaza and forked over $450 million by which hamas was able to transfer the money to iran to buy missiles. the fact of the matter is qatar is playing a dangerous game with hamas. they see themselves as the great new power player for islamist politics in the middle east and the united states has got to be a little wiser than welcoming an amir to the united states when he is funding a terrorist organization that the united states condemns as a major state sponsor of terror. >> sensitive times for sure. former u.s. ambassador marc ginsberg. why are political opponents of health care making it happen? a hybrid? most are just no fun to drive. now, here's one that will make you feel alive. meet
point out, there's been a 33-year-old peace pact with the israelis and with egypt perhaps mr. morsi will be loathe to push the eswriptian military any way to break that at all, and, of course, on top of that president morsi has to bear in mind significant aid packages from the west and from the imf, which he needs badly so his country's heavily damaged economy can begin to recover. many issues, he certainly faces there, but, of course, he must tread that fine line between the international role egypt must maintain and the stability and, of course, keeping popular opinion inside egypt satisfied. many expecting egypt to perhaps come to a greater level of assistance for hamas at this point, suzanne. >> just minutes ago we saw the authority, the president of mahmoud abbas saying they are denying palestinians the right to establish an independent state, taking a really hard line there. you also say the israeli military putting out this statement an hour ago saying they're going to operate so the mission has been complete and that hamas has now turned the gaza strip into a base for the ir
the positioning and navigating she has to do in her meeting with mr. morsi. >> soledad, we can report to you that, according to the u.s. embassy here, secretary clinton has arrived here in cairo and she's going to be meeting with egyptian president mohamed morsi very soon. with the violence escalating, the spotlight, the pressure is on secretary clinton and washington. the u.s. seems to be broadening its role. the key role the u.s. is going to play here is with its sway over israel. obviously, israel and washington are best friends. washington has a lot of influence with israel. but the problem is, washington does not have a relationship with hamas. the u.s. sees hamas as a terrorist group, of course. i think that's where egypt could play a significant role here. look for secretary clinton to push egypt, its president, mohamed morsi, to get hamas to make some concessions to possibly hammer out a cease fire. yesterday egyptian officials were optimistic that a cease fire would come. today, it's not the case. all parties here seem to be continuing the push to hammer out some sort of truce while the
, obama found in his phone calls that mr. morsi recognized the danger of an escalating conflict. in the long run as the united states have an expanded role in what is going on over there? guest: in the end without some american intervention or leadership role, it is very difficult to envision a genuine comprehensive peace. the parties have to want it. and it is clear. part of the problem for mr. obama is that when he came to office the first time around, he did make that a central issue. he appointed senator mitchell as the first envoy. it was a priority position for him. and he did not get anywhere. in part, the in the arm it was really good for it. more importantly, the government really did not cooperate with him as he had expected. and the relationship between the prime minister and obama was not very good and has not been a very good. this is an opportunity for the israelis to rebuild it now that he has won reelection. it is no secret that the israelis preferred to see met romney become president. that was an issue. but he felt he did a lot and did not get anywhere. the eco
they are able to pull that off. in the longer term it's a real balancing act for mr. morsi. here on the streets he has a population strongly in support of the palestinians but he's got to keep the peace. to keep the peace he's going to get western investments and see this economy going. we are seeing evidence of that balancing act behind me off in the distance, a small crowd of protestors teargassed a few moments ago and we could expect larger numbers on the streets tomorrow, gregg. gregg: thanks very much. ainsley: what does the cease-fire mean? what does the end game mean in the middle east. jonathan sanzer the founder of defense for democracy and the author of hamas vs. fatah, the struggle for palestine. happy thanksgiving to you. >> thank you. happy tkpapbghappen happy thanksgiving. >> i think the israelis and hamas are both claiming victory. the israelis got what they were looking for long range rockets smuggled in see a sudan. they took out all the rockets. for hamas 4 they were able to fire rockets into the israeli heartland. i don't think they will be able to do it to the extent of this
. >> as the protests intensified, mr. morsy asked for calm. for those that gathered out of the pal lace, he defended hits decrees and defended accusations of a power grab. >> translator: i didn't take a decision against anyone or pick a side against another. i have to put myself in a clear bath, a path that achiefs a clear goal. >> it's now after midnight, and pockets of clashes continue around tahrir square, and many of the demonstrators are pitching tents, an indication the demonstrations could continue through the weekend. >>> only two days ago, secretary of state hillary clinton was praising the egyptian government for it's leadership in bringing stability and peace to the east. let's go to dan lothian. >> reporter: there is concern about too much power in the hands of one man. he played a key role in that cease fire, he developed what one official says is a relationship of trust with president obama, but as we know with every relationship, things can get complicated. >> at the white house, a sense of calm, kicking off the holiday season with the arrival of a 19 foot christmas tree. >> it is per
this is unacceptable. we thank mr. morsi for his efforts in brokering a cease fire which is incredibly fragile, but this is not acceptable. this is not what the united states of america taxpayers expect. our dollars will be directly related to the progress towards democracy which you promised the people of egypt when your party and you were elected president. >> that's the issue, the money. >> if you hold that -- >> there are millions of dollars at stake here. >> billions of dollars. congress says look we are going to withhold this money until there's a movement there all of the aid that goes to that region is pulled. >> holding money is one thing but maybe you withhold the praise they showered on morsi after he stepped in between hamas and israel. they were quick to praise him. >> they didn't know he was going to do a power grab. why not treat someone with honey who you think are on your side. >> why because a lot of people will tell you they were funneling arms from egypt to hamas that's how this got started from iran to egypt to hamas. >> let us know what you think about the latest developm
of in this is specifically going into -- [inaudible] and one-third of that into gaza. >> mr. martin hallward. >> congratulate morsi of egypt on his moderating role, but also his advice to vote yes to the recognition of pal the tin yang states at the united nations, thereby demonstrating some small progress for those palestinians promoting the path of diplomacy, not violence. >> well, this is the debate that we entered into earlier. now, i've had this discussion with my egyptian counterparts a couple of times already, understandably, and as i say, there's a wholly legitimate point of view about that. my judgment is that it's important to do whatever is necessary to support a return to negotiations and that a vote now in the general assembly does not support that. so that is the government's considered view. we will continue to discuss this with our european partners as to how we should respond to the actual vote. >> jeremy corbin. >> could the foreign secretary have a word with the undersecretary of state who is apparently in ramallah today and in israel yesterday and to suggest that he goes on to visit gaza
with israeli prime minister benjamin netanyahu and egyptian president morsi and decide d that mrs. clinton needed to be there in person. she'll travel to israel first and then ramallah in the west bank and cairo to try to curtail the violence. >> clinton will emphasize the united states interests in a peaceful outcome. an outcome that can lead to improved conditions for the civilian residents of gaza. >> there are a couple of encouraging signs on the road to peace. today egypt's president said the aggression in gaza would end today and radio was saying a ceasefire could come tonight. since the fighting started a week ago more than 100 palestinians have been killed including 54 civilians according to the associated press. three israeli civilians have died. let me bring in nbc's martin fletcher in tel aviv for us and "washington post" columnist e.j. deion. mar martin, let me start with you. it sounds like, at least in the last couple of hours, they're getting closer to a deal. where do things stand? >> reporter: that's right. as you said, it is very encouraging signs. the fact that not only
times called egypt's new president mohamed morsi to ask what it would take to stop the violence. mr. obama then sent secretary of state clinton to the middle east. the violence in gaza has forced the administration back into the middleman role it seemed to abandon last year when two years of work by middle east special envoy george mitchell came up empty. but now under the threat of war the u.s. sees little choice except to step in. secretary clinton will ask the palestinians to stop the rocket attacks and ask israel to offer more hope of a longer term peace agreement. >> the goal must be a durable outcome that promotes regional stability and advances the security and legitimate aspirations of the israelis and palestinians alike. >> reporter: the crucial player now is president morsi of egypt whose islamist government openly supports hamas because the u.s. and israel see hamas as a terrorist organization, morsi is essentially the go-between. this is new ground for both the president and the secretary of state. regional and popular support for hamas and the palestinians has never bee
president mohammed morsi an underscore necessity for hamas that the united states consider aster rorrist group. mr. obama talked to the israeli prime minister to get update on the situation. many analysts say unless there is a cease-fire in 48 hours it's uncertain there will be an escalation. shannon? >> shannon: david lee miller live in israel. thank you. we are going to look at the reasons that israel is striking back against gaza furiously right now. national security correspondent jennifer griffin puts the story in per speculative. >> the gaza conflict may be phase one as they prepare for strike against iran nuclear program. conventioconventional wisdom isy will strike back. >> our problem is not our border with gaza, but other country's boarder with gaza. access of the arms that come from iran through sudan. among rockets fired at us come directly from iran. we know the hamster rorrist trained with iranians. strong connection. >> they can reach tel aviv and jerusalem from gaza. in the past year, they smuggled components for the rocket through tunnels from each of the desert to gaza.
by mr. abbas. the players and devices we've used in the past are difficult to use. >> what sort of political pressure, though, is morsi feeling? they have an agreement with israel. it is a relatively new government, a new construct. he's being tested essentially. hit basically from both sides. what are those dynamics like? those domestic politics for the egyptians? >> what is new now is the political leadership of egypt has a direct and personal involvement with one party, not the palestinian authority, not israel, but the hamas movement in gaza. so there is a natural affinity as stated by the prime minister and they are essentially on hamas' side ideologically. on the other hand, the president of egypt has made clear he doesn't want to throw over the israel/egypt peace agreement. how far can he go in supporting hamas without getting rid of that agreement or undermining it in a fundamental way? i expect him to go quite far. >> do you think the election affected the timing of this. did hamas step up its attacks to test the obama administration? did netanyahu act waiting for romne
president morsi, closed the deal as this official said. they also praised secretary clinton saying that she did an exceptional job. but again going back to what they are saying as mr. obama was very directly involved. one of the things also, wolf, that they're pointing at that i think will prove to be very important is this burgeoning relationship with the egyptian president morsi. i mean, just think of it. just a short time ago he was the new man on the block, muslim brotherhood, lots of doubts about him. and now look at the words that the president used. there's a lot of praise for his personal role in bringing about this cease-fire. that could go a long way. in fact, they say that he was very pragmatic. that's president morsi, very pragmatic. they developed a relationship they say based on trust and were able to work through these issues. so down the road that's going to be important, wolf. >> basically the bottom line in all of this is that the u.s. is also, jill, provided some assurances to both the israeli government of prime minister netanyahu and the egyptian government of president
Search Results 0 to 28 of about 29 (some duplicates have been removed)